August 24, 2020 2020/08/24 68

Determination of virus size at body temperature by nano sensor

TMU researchers, in collaboration with researchers from Nottingham Trent University (UK), were succeeded to determine the size of viruses at body temperature and laboratory temperature; using an electromechanical method and a biosensor. According to them, this method is capable to determine the number of a specific type of particle in the test sample.

Determination of virus size at body temperature by nano sensor

Massoud Soltan Rezaei, TMU's postdoctoral researcher, said: "In this research, we were able to introduce a new method based on sensors for measuring viruses at body temperature and laboratory temperature. The sensor introduced in these studies is used in medical diagnostic laboratories to determine the size of a virus or the number of viruses in a test sample. In addition to biotechnology and medical engineering, the proposed model is also used as a detector in various industries (including the oil and gas industry to identify and measure different particles, as well as metropolitan areas and factories to measure airborne particulate pollution)". Miniature electromechanical systems form a class of bioMEMS that can provide appropriate sensitivity. In this research, a thermo-electro-mechanical model is presented to detect biological particles in the microscale. Identification in the model is based on analyzing pull-in instability parameters and frequency shifts.
He added: "In these studies, there is no need to use special materials to perform or repeat any experiment, and the sensor can be used in multiple experiments. Also, the duration of the experiment is very short and the results are instantaneous. In addition, it is possible to inject this sensor into the living body due to its very small size. Another advantage of the proposed model is that it is sensitive to temperature and reflects the effects of temperature change on the system's response."
Miniature electromechanical systems form a class of bioMEMS that can provide appropriate sensitivity. In this research, a thermo-electro-mechanical model is presented to detect biological particles in the microscale. Identification in the model is based on analyzing pull-in instability parameters and frequency shifts. The coupled effects of system parameters such as surface layer energy, electric field correction, and material properties are incorporated in this thermosensitive model. Afterward, the accuracy of the present model and obtained results are validated with experimental, analytical, and numerical data for several cases. Performing a parametric study reveals that mechanical properties of biosensors can significantly affect the detection sensitivity of actuated ultra-small detectors and should be taken into account. The present analysis is likely to provide pertinent guidelines to design thermal switches and miniature detectors with the desired performance. The developed biosensor is more appropriate to detect and characterize viruses in samples with different temperatures.
TMU researcher stated: "Implementing this research is part of a large-scale project to build biosensors. This sensor should be as small as possible and capable to be injected into the living body. In the following, we plan to design a sensor that can not only determine the size of bio-particles, but also determine their type. This sensor should be as small as possible and capable to be injected into the living body.
This research was conducted in collaboration with Dr. Mehdi Badaghi (academic member of Nottingham Trent University, UK) and Dr. Amin Farrokhabadi (academic member of Tarbiat Modares University). This research has published in an article entitled "A thermosensitive electromechanical model for detecting biological particles" in Scientific Reports journal with an impact factor of 4.011 (2019).